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20121204
20121204
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syria. hillary clinton had a statement out yesterday. she's in the czech republic, and she said this. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event there's credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people, but suffice it to say we are certainly planning to take action if that eventuality were to occur. first of all, what do you think that means, specifically? and, and what should it mean? >> i think it means that it's a red line for americans and the world. if that were to happen then i would expect some form of very tough military response. >> which would be what? >> i think it would be unlikely to speculate and specify right now and that's why she's being cautious in what she said. but up to now, what the west has been doing is giving some political support to the syrian opposition, obviously trying to resolve the situation as far as is possible. it's not been possible so far. >> and every day 100 people die or more. >> there are a lot of people dying. now the death toll probably would be around 40,000
starr, thanks. appreciate that. troubling developments out of syria come as hillary clinton made repeated the united states position that it will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons. >> we have made our views very clear. this is a red line for the united states. >> so is the united states about to get involved in syria's 20-month-old conflict? out front tonight, bob baer, peter brooks. nice to have both of you with us. bob, what do you think when does the united states get involved? >> i think the fact they're mixing it is highly alarming, of course. if they start deploying this, if they start putting it on artillery shells, if it looks like they're going to really fire this stuff, you know, i don't see any choice but we're going to have to go in. the west is completely -- what i'd also like to say is, that with the alloites, the regime that runs syria, would they use it? absolutely. if their back is against the wall and they think they're going to go down, they will use any of these binary gases that would stop the revolt, what they would -- they are that desperate. i don't
.6% rate of the clinton years? he did not. so is there a little give ultimately to sort of say what if it doesn't go up to 39.6%, but say 37%, is that something the white house would accept? also, this that same interview, the president raised the possibility, which is that after you do tax reform and you close loopholes and deductions, that if the rate is raised, the top rate, there's always a possibility that after you do tax reform, of course, the top rate would then go down again. so it was -- you have to listen to the president very carefully to see where there might be some give. the problem from my point of view is that everybody knows what's got to be done in the long-term. it's the question of the short-term deal. >> john boehner, speaker of the house, he came up with a proposal. but not all the conservatives in the house and the senate are on board. jim demint, republican senator from south carolina. >> this is a time to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us. his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table un
after secretary of state clinton said the use of chemical weapons by the regime would cross a red line. is the president drawing that line and is he bringing the united states any closer to military action in doing so? >> well, john, i think we ought to be clear. they could have left it today with secretary clinton's statement. i think this was a very deliberate point that the president was making. he is fully engaged in this issue. clearly the president's been briefed, he's talking to his cabinet. we should assume that the united states military has continued the operations on the table fully prepared ready to go. there has been talk about the chemical weapons of syria for months, the military has had time to prepare. the administration has been clear, a military option is not where they want to have to go but i think the president's statement makes the point that they will go there if they have to, and i think that's the right message to send. we cannot permit syria to think using their chemical weapons and sarin gas stockpiles is an option for them. >> you make the important point t
bloomberg wanted hillary clinton to succeed him. bloomberg encouraged the secretary of state to >>> cloudy skies this morning. a beautiful sunrise outside from our mount vaca cam. right now most of the bay area dry although we are starting to see scattered showers in the north bay. that's what we'll see on and off today not a whole lot of rain just a few light showers wet at times in the area. temperatures this afternoon mainly into the 60s. the main rain event coming overnight tonight into tomorrow morning. showers through wednesday, drying out on thursday and friday. >>> football is a violent sport, adding guns to the mix does not help. this morning, john miller looks at the tragic case of jovan belcher and why many inside the nfl are looking at the culture of guns in pro sports. >>> and red light cameras bring in millions of dollars in tickets for cities and towns across the country. but now drivers are fighting back. filing a massive lawsuit claiming those stoplights don't give them a fair chance. >> if you're timing them too short, then it just becomes a
for tax reform and robert reish, former secretary of labor for president bill clinton and the author of "beyond outrage." none of the three of us are beyond outrage, grover norquist, which is why i keep having you back. the situation it seems to me as an impartial observer here is that both sides have now made fairly ludicrous offers that they know the other side is never going to accept in a million years. that does beg the question, grover, why bother, given that both sides know where they need to move, why the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so the president seems to be moving the goal posts in a deliberate effort, i don't know, to extract something, to push people over the fiscal cliff. something's going on and it's not clear because he's not where he use
on the president's list of possible replacements for hillary clinton who has said that she is not staying on for the president's second term. cnn's elise labott is at the state department to talk about it. do a comparison for us, off the bat. pros and cons for the top diplomatic post. the halls of the state department are buzzing with potential new secretary of state. both would make a strong candidate. susan rice, for instance, one of president obama's closest advisers. she was his principal foreign policy adviser during his first campaign and helped shape his world view. they have a similar world view. all of this signifies susan rice would be influential when she goes to speak to diplomats around the world and world leaders and also in formulating foreign policy, which is very good for the state department. on the downside, you see what's happening with the benghazi affair. she's likely to have a bruising confirmation process. some republican senators said they might hold up her nomination. that could drag out a while. john kerry, on the other hand, would be easily confirmable. you see
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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